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(570) 376-2800 (Middlebury Center)
(570) 662-7655 (Mansfield)

New Puppy/Kitten

Getting a new puppy?

Puppies will need their vaccinations. Your puppy should be vaccinated against the following dangers:

  • Distemper
  • Canine adenovirus
  • Parvo
  • Leptospirosis
  • Coronavirus
  • Rabies*
  • Kennel Cough (if boarding in a kennel)
  • Influenza (recommended but not required)
  • Lyme (recommended but not required)

Puppy vaccinations can begin as early as 6 weeks of age. They will need a series of vaccines that will end when they are 16 weeks of age. The Rabies vaccination cannot be given until your puppy reaches 12 weeks of age. The Lymes vaccine can be given after your puppy turns 9 weeks old.

Word of caution: If you get a new puppy and it is 8 weeks old and the breeder says it has all its puppy shots, your puppy will still need to continue the vaccine series until it is 16 weeks of age. Since the Rabies cannot be given until they are 12 weeks of age, the puppy you got at 8 weeks old did not get their Rabies vaccine.

Getting a new kitty?

Kittens will need their vaccinations. Your kitty should be vaccinated against the following dangers:

  • Distemper or Panleukopenia
  • Rhinotracheitis
  • Calicivirus
  • Feline Leukemia (FeLV)
  • Rabies*

Their vaccinations can begin as early as 6 weeks of age. Once the first one is given the second will then need boostered 3-4 weeks later. The Rabies vaccination cannot be given until your kitty reaches 12 weeks of age. The Feline Leukemia vaccine can be started at 9 weeks of age.

Word of caution: If you bring a new kitty (or even an older cat) into your home where you have other cats, be aware of the risks of Feline Leukemia (Felv). The Feline Leukemia virus can be transmitted through saliva, feces, and milk from infected cats. Cats at greatest risk of infection are those that may be exposed to infected cats, either via prolonged close contact or through bite wounds. Such cats include:

  • Cats living with infected cats or with cats of unknown infection status
  • Cats allowed outdoors unsupervised, where they may be bitten by an infected cat
  • Kittens born to infected mothers

*Rabies Vaccinations can only be given by licensed veterinarians.

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